HLPF Side Event Focuses on Sanitation as Key Determinant of Health and Education
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The event discussed, among others, the launch of an accountability report by Global Citizen, which tracks sanitation, health and education commitments, and underscores the importance of partnerships.

Participants emphasized that investments in sanitation provide a five-to-one return in related healthcare benefits, including a reduction in acute respiratory infections.

12 July 2018: On Thursday, 12 July 2018, on the sidelines of the High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF), a side event highlighted sanitation as a key determinant of health and education. Panelists highlighted the importance of safe water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and the interlinkages between them, shared examples of successful projects, identified ongoing challenges, and highlighted the need for continued efforts.

The event was organized by the Water Supply and Sanitation Collaboration Council (WSSCC), the Qatar Fund for Development, Education for All and Global Citizen – a movement of engaged citizens who are collectively taking action to end extreme poverty by 2030. Titled ‘Sanitation for Education and Health: An Integrated Approach to Human Development,’ the event discussed, inter alia, the launch of an accountability report by Global Citizen, which tracks sanitation, health and education commitments, and underscores the importance of partnerships.

Every dollar invested in education produces two dollars in economic benefit.

Rolf Luyendijk, WSSCC, emphasized that investments in sanitation provide a five-to-one return in related healthcare benefits, including a reduction in acute respiratory infections, which he called the “number one child killer.” He announced a WSSCC-Qatar Charity agreement to support sanitation and hygiene programme design and development, specifically in the Darfur region of Sudan.

Ali Abdulla Al-Dabbagh, Qatar Fund for Development, said every dollar invested in education produces two dollars in economic benefit. He underscored the need for tangible progress on SDG 6 (clean water and sanitation) and its linkages with SDG 3 (good health and well-being), SDG 4 (quality education) and SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth).

Speakers stressed, inter alia, that: six million people still defecate in the open in Kenya; investment in sanitation and hygiene must address equity and human rights; and the schooling of 42% of Ugandan girls is interrupted because they have to fetch water. During the discussion, participants highlighted the importance of, among other things: investing in and working with local non-governmental organizations (NGOs); investments in rural areas; and addressing the sanitation needs of people with disabilities. [IISD-RS Coverage of Side Event on Sanitation for Education and Health] [Global Citizen Accountability Report] [WSSCC News Story on Agreement with Qatar Charity] [WSSCC Website]


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