WWF/TRAFFIC Report Assesses Impacts of International Trade on Walrus Populations
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The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and TRAFFIC have released the report 'Hauling Out: International Trade and Management of Walrus,' which concludes that a lack of long-term data and poor information quality on walrus populations makes it difficult to determine the impacts of international trade or climate change on the species.

haulin-out27 November 2014: The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and TRAFFIC have released a report, titled ‘Hauling Out: International Trade and Management of Walrus,’ which concludes that a lack of long-term data and poor information quality on walrus populations makes it difficult to determine the impacts of international trade or climate change on the species.

The report notes that, although commercial walrus hunting has not occurred since the mid-20th century, hunting for subsistence purposes, with catch supporting food and income security, as well as the cultural identity of Arctic peoples, is still allowed in Canada, Greenland, the Russian Federation and the US, with a small walrus sport hunt permitted in Canada. Norway is the only range State that prohibits hunting.

International trade in walrus parts and derivatives is regulated by the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The report’s main conclusion urges improved monitoring of international trade in walrus parts and better data on the population size, trends and demographics of both Atlantic and Pacific Walrus populations to ensure that harvest levels are sustainable. [Publication: Hauling Out: International Trade and Management of Walrus] [TRAFFIC News]

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