‘Why Wait?’: Report Explores SDG Dividends from Accelerated Access to Decentralized Electricity
UN Photo/Christopher Herwig
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The framework developed in the report is designed to help decision makers to compare different electrification options and services.

The report focuses on identifying options for achieving Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7, which calls for universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030, but also explores benefits for other SDGs.

16 November 2017: On the sidelines of the UN Climate Change Conference in Bonn, Germany, Sustainable Energy for All (SEforALL) and Power for All released a report that presents a framework for understanding and quantifying financial, educational and environmental dividends for households through accelerated access to decentralized electricity.

Titled “Why Wait? Seizing the Energy Access Dividend,” the report was developed with contributions from the Overseas Development Institute (ODI). It presents case studies in Bangladesh, Ethiopia and Kenya, and highlights the benefits from promoting electricity access through the use of solar energy or clean energy mini-grids to power household services such as lighting and mobile-phone charging. The report indicates that decentralized renewable energy solutions would permit more time for students to study, and highlights that the three case study countries also had reductions in black carbon emissions due to reduced kerosene use.

The framework developed in the report is designed to help decision makers to compare different electrification options and services, ranging from “Tier 1” electricity service (a few hours of power a day) to more robust and costly “Tiers 4” and “Tier 5.”

The report focuses on identifying options for achieving Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 7, which calls for universal access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all by 2030. It highlights that savings on expenditures for lighting and phone charging would increase households’ disposable income, contributing to SDG 1 (no poverty) and SDG 10 (reduced inequalities). It could also contribute to achieving SDG 2 (zero hunger) and SDG 3 (good health and well-being). More time for studying would contribute to SDG 4 (quality education). Reductions in carbon dioxide and black carbon emissions would contribute to SDG 13 (climate action) and SDG 3. The report also indicates that some research suggests that access to electricity can affect productivity and employment in home-based businesses, which could contribute to SDG 1 and SDG 8 (decent work and economic growth). [Publication: Why Wait?: Seizing the Energy Access Dividend]


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