UNIDO Publication Spotlights SIDS’ Sustainable Development
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As a follow up to the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS), the UN Industrial Development Organization's (UNIDO) ‘Making It' publication examines the potential of SIDS to pursue sustainable economic development by steadily increasing economic productivity.

The 'Small islands, developing States' issue (Number 17) questions whether SIDS can, inter alia: fully utilize their cultural and physical resources to generate employment and income while sustainability managing their environment and human resources; sustainably manage fishing and tourism resources; and address climate change impacts.

UNIDODecember 2014: As a follow up to the Third International Conference on Small Island Developing States (SIDS), the UN Industrial Development Organization’s (UNIDO) ‘Making It’ publication examines the potential of SIDS to pursue sustainable economic development by steadily increasing economic productivity.

The ‘Small islands, developing States’ issue (Number 17) questions whether SIDS can, inter alia: fully use their cultural and physical resources to generate employment and income while sustainability managing their environment and human resources; sustainably manage fishing and tourism resources; and address climate change impacts.

In a keynote feature, Wu Hongo, UN Under Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, reviews efforts to enhance SIDS’ resilience and discusses ways to strengthen their productive capacities. He recommends promoting new approaches in the productive sector beyond SIDS’ traditional strengths in tourism and fisheries, including approaches focused on entrepreneurship and innovation and partnerships to facilitate the development of new skills and technology in SIDS. He identifies climate change adaptation and mitigation, disaster risk reduction (DRR) and renewable energy as new sectors for innovation.

“Climate change will have a ripple effect on several socio-economic factors in the SIDS,’ in addition to its direct impacts, according to the publication, which describes likely climate change impacts on the Caribbean and Pacific fishing industries and tourism. The report recommends, inter alia: adoption of a legally binding agreement with clear, achievable targets to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions; development of growth indicators that address climate change, human health, natural resource depletion, poverty and quality of life; diversification of sectors and creation of low-carbon jobs to increase economic resilience to climate change; and renewable energy investments.

Pacific unity is shifting fisheries control to the Pacific islands, Giff Johnson argues in an article. He describes the Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA), which established a vessel day scheme (VDS) for the Pacific’s tuna fisheries, and highlights how Pacific countries have increased their revenue from fishing from US$60 million annually in 2010 to US$250 million in 2013 through the VDS.

In the Caribbean, the creative industries represent an engine for economic growth and diversification, according to an article by Keith Nurse. Nurse states that the creative industry sector is one of the fastest growing economic sectors globally and highlights its potential for diversifying economies, promoting youth entrepreneurship, improving competitiveness and supporting economic growth.

Articles also address: transitions to a low-carbon future; green entrepreneurship; fair trade; youth employment in the Pacific islands; Aruba’s energy strategy; and Haiti’s green enterprises. [Publication: Making It: Small islands, developing States] [IISD RS Coverage of SIDS Conference]


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