UNFCCC Report Provides Insight on Development and Enhancement of Endogenous Capacities, Technologies
story highlights

The UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee TEC published a report titled, ‘Developing and Enhancing Endogenous Capacities and Technologies’ based on stakeholder surveys.

Survey respondents place strongest emphasis on: assessing climate-related technology needs from individual to national levels; identifying appropriate technologies to assist in meeting identified needs; and adapting technologies to local needs and conditions.

Strategies to enhance endogenous capacities and technologies include a participatory approach, understanding internal conditions, facilitating partnerships across sectors, incorporating local knowledge, and facilitating connections to funding, each tailored to local contexts.

November 2018: The UNFCCC Technology Executive Committee (TEC) published a report describing what endogenous capacities and technologies are, and what further developing and enhancing them might entail. Issued ahead of the Katowice Climate Change Conference, the report finds a lack of common understanding on the meaning of endogenous capacities and endogenous technologies, particularly in the context of climate change.

Based on stakeholder surveys, the report titled, ‘Developing and Enhancing Endogenous Capacities and Technologies: Technology Stakeholders’ Perspectives,’ responds to a request made at the 21st session of the Conference of the Parties (COP 21) to the UNFCCC to gain insight as to stakeholders’ “views on the elements and features that could be used to describe, develop and enhance endogenous capacities and technologies.” It asks respondents to consider what should be included in definitions of the terms, building on a preliminary desk study released in March 2017.

The earlier study sought to better understand the concepts of endogenous capacities and technology, and examine how they have been applied in various contexts. Acknowledging the lack of a standard definition, the study drew on the literature to note that “endogenous” may refer to locally available resources, knowledge, culture and leadership, with an objective of empowering communities to take control of their own development agenda in a manner that best fits local conditions. Common elements of the concept include national innovation systems, local/national ownership, human capital, local/national knowledge, local/national economies, external resources that best fit the local/national conditions, a participatory approach, institutional infrastructures and policy mechanisms that boost internal developments.

Although related, the concept of “indigenous” is distinct from “endogenous.”

On defining endogenous capacities, the new report finds that survey respondents place strongest emphasis on: assessing climate-related technology needs from individual to national levels; identifying appropriate technologies to assist in meeting identified needs; and adapting technologies to local needs and conditions. With regard to endogenous technologies, stakeholders emphasize technology development within the country and “technologies developed elsewhere but adapted to local needs and conditions” as being of highest importance. It is important to note, as done in the preliminary study, that although related, the concept of “indigenous” is distinct from “endogenous.”

The report also features input from the UNFCCC Financial Mechanism’s operating entities, which include the Global Environment Facility (GEF) and Green Climate Fund (GCF), among others. It outlines the extent to which endogenous capacities or technologies, or their main elements, are mentioned or touched upon by these entities’ work, activities and projects. For institutions seeking to develop and enhance endogenous capacities and technologies, the TEC finds that taking a participatory approach, understanding internal conditions, facilitating partnerships across sectors, incorporating local knowledge, and facilitating connections to funding are all suggested strategies, but that these must be tailored to local contexts.

The TEC was created in 2010 as the policy arm of the UNFCCC Technology Mechanism, focusing on “identifying policies that can accelerate the development and transfer of low-emission and climate resilient technologies.” The TEC is comprised of 20 experts from developed and developing countries, and reports on performance and activities to the COP. Key TEC focus areas include adaptation and mitigation technologies; climate technology financing; technology needs assessments (TNAs); innovation and technology research, development, and demonstration (RD&D); and emerging and cross-cutting issues. The Katowice Climate Change Conference is convening in Poland, from 2-14 December 2018. [Publication: Developing and Enhancing Endogenous Capacities and Technologies] [Publication Landing Page] [TEC Website]


related events


related posts