UN Photo/Marco Dormino
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The Africa Poverty Clock presents real-time poverty forecasts for every country in Africa with interactive maps that illustrate countries' status for SDG target 1.1 on ending extreme poverty.

Speaking during the launch event, the UNECA Executive Secretary Songwe stressed that current projections show that all countries in the region are "off track" for achieving SDG 1.

January 2019: The UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) has launched the Africa Poverty Clock, a platform providing real-time estimates of progress towards ending extreme poverty, in line with SDG 1 (no poverty). The Clock was launched as part of UNECA’s 60th anniversary commemoration.

The Africa Poverty Clock is a customized version of a world poverty clock developed by the World Data Lab, which provides real-time poverty estimates through 2030 for the majority of countries around the world. The Africa Poverty Clock presents real-time poverty forecasts for every country in Africa with interactive maps that illustrate countries on track for SDG target 1.1 on ending extreme poverty, countries that are off-track for SDG target 1.1 and will not be able to reach the target at the current poverty escape rate, and countries where poverty is rising.

Based on real-time poverty forecasts, the Gambia and Mauritania are classified as “on track” for SDG target 1.1 on ending extreme poverty.

The Gambia and Mauritania are the only countries classified as “on track.” Poverty is rising in Burundi, Chad, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Guinea, Madagascar, Malawi, Nigeria, South Africa, South Sudan, Sudan, Swaziland and Zambia.

The Africa Poverty Clock also features a “target escape rate” that shares the current rate of poverty reduction for African countries and the continent as a whole. Malawi, for example, has a target escape rate of 2.2 and a current escape rate of -0.5, resulting in its classification as a country that is both off target and experiencing rising poverty, with 71.1% of its population classified as in poverty.

In remarks at the launch, UNECA Executive Secretary Vera Songwe recognized the “remarkable progress” many African countries have achieved over the last six decades. She described Africa today as “an Africa that has risen” and is moving towards economic independence. Despite this progress, Songwe stressed, over 400 million people in Africa live in extreme poverty, inequality and poverty “remain persistently high,” and current projections show that all countries in the region are off track to achieve SDG 1. She urged “bigger and bolder actions to accelerate the pace of sustainable economic growth and development” and called for improved insights, knowledge and innovative partnerships.

The UNECA celebrated 60 years of promoting the economic and social development of Africa on 17 December 2018. [UNECA Press Release] [Africa Poverty Clock] [UNECA Commemoration] [World Poverty Clock]

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