UNDP-SIWI Water Governance Facility Evaluates Accountability in Water and Sanitation
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The UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) have published a joint evaluation of accountability in the water supply and sanitation sectors.

The study, by the SIWI-UNDP Water Governance Facility, draws on data from Global Assessment of Accountability in Water and Sanitation Services (GLAAS), a regular report issued by UN-Water.

The study found that urban water services demonstrate the highest levels of accountability, and rural sanitation services the lowest.

June 2018: The UN Development Programme (UNDP) and the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) have published a joint evaluation of accountability in the water supply and sanitation sectors, which finds that urban water services demonstrate the highest levels of accountability, and rural sanitation services the lowest.

The study, conducted by the SIWI-UNDP Water Governance Facility, draws on data from the Global Assessment of Accountability in Water and Sanitation Services (GLAAS), a regular report issued by UN-Water.

Based on 2014 GLAAS data, the study includes 94 countries, and shows that many have yet to define the roles and responsibilities of their water and sanitation service agencies. It finds that aid donors are experiencing tension between wanting to support and strengthen national systems, and maintaining a high level of integrity in the use of funds. Furthermore, almost every country studied needs to improve their information collection from service providers, and their reporting of sector performance.

The study calls for bridging the gap between participation policy and actual participation.

The authors find that, while many countries have policies for participation in water and sanitation services, in reality, most have implemented low to moderate levels of stakeholder participation. SDG target 6.b calls for supporting and strengthening the participation of local communities in improving water and sanitation management.

The authors call for bridging the gap between participation policy and actual participation. They also recommend strengthening regulatory functions through a model that combines supervision with guidance, technical support and information dissemination overall, especially in rural areas.

The study results are published in the Water Alternatives journal.

Earlier in 2018, civil society organizations (CSOs) published results from a 25-country study on national accountability mechanisms for implementing SDG 6 on clean water and sanitation, supported by the Sanitation and Water for All (SWA) initiative. The study noted that the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development does not set standards for institutionalizing civil society participation in international and national voluntary review processes for SDG 6, and calls for accelerating accountability to improve the situation of vulnerable groups in society. [Publication: Global Assessment of Accountability in Water and Sanitation Services Using GLAAS Data] [UNDP-SIWI Water Governance Facility Press Release] [SDG Knowledge Hub Story on CSO Accountability Review]


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