UN-REDD COP 20 Event Examines REDD+ Post-2015
story highlights

The UN Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation (UN-REDD) organized a high-level dialogue to explore a post-2015 vision for REDD+ as a catalyst for sustainable development and the 2016-2020 role of UN-REDD.

The side event, 'Looking Forward: REDD+ Post 2015,' convened on the margins of the Lima Climate Change Conference.

limacop208 December 2014: The UN Collaborative Programme on Reducing Emissions from Deforestation (UN-REDD) organized a high-level dialogue to explore a post-2015 vision for REDD+ as a catalyst for sustainable development and the 2016-2020 role of UN-REDD. The side event, ‘Looking Forward: REDD+ Post 2015,’ convened on the margins of the Lima Climate Change Conference.

In opening remarks, Helen Clark, UN Development Programme (UNDP) Administrator and Chair of the UN Development Group, said that, as the largest terrestrial store of carbon, forests must be at the center of post-2015 development efforts. Noting that 13 million hectares of forest are cleared annually, accounting for around 20% of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, Clark highlighted UN-REDD’s efforts to support readiness activities in 56 countries to implement the Warsaw Framework for REDD+.

Eduardo Rojas-Briales, Assistant Director-General for Forestry, the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO), said that REDD+ programmes should contribute to adequate nutrition and deliver a range of development benefits, especially for local people. Per Pharo, Director, Norway’s International Climate and Forest Initiative, also noted REDD+’s potential to offer a win-win solution for a vibrant “new climate economy” for both people and forests.

Vicky Tauli-Corpuz, UN Special Rapporteur on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, cited a study in Brazil that showed deforestation rates in areas under indigenous control are much lower than the national average. She stressed the need to safeguard indigenous peoples’ human rights, lamenting that indigenous leaders continue to be killed for asserting their rights to forests.

A representative from Indonesia noted that the country has passed through a “cut-and-run” phase to a “cut-and-plant” phase and needs to shift to a “maintain-and-restore” phase to improve productivity and restore degraded lands, calling for the post-2015 development agenda to focus on “mitidaption,” a combination of adaptation and mitigation. Ecuador, Zambia and Tunisia also shared country REDD+ experiences, describing successes and areas for improvement.

In the ensuing discussion, participants highlighted, inter alia: the complexities of the REDD+ funding processes; the need to focus on forest landscape restoration before REDD+ resources are made available; and efforts to strengthen forest governance and the rule of law in the establishment of safeguard information systems. [IISD RS ENBOTS Coverage] [IISD RS Coverage of Lima Climate Change Conference] [UN-REDD Event Announcement]


related events


related posts