Tool Reveals Links Between Human Rights Recommendations, SDG Targets
UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré
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The Danish Institute for Human Rights launched the UPR-SDG Data Explorer, which illustrates relationships among recommendations from the UN Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review and the SDGs.

Users can use the tool to explore the links between human rights and the SDGs and to identify priority areas for SDG implementation.

DIHR also published a report titled, ‘Human Rights and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: Lessons learned and next steps,’ which shares tools and lessons learned to inspire integrated approaches that can contribute to realizing human rights and sustainable development for all.

16 April 2018: The Danish Institute for Human Rights (DIHR) has launched the UPR-SDG Data Explorer, which uses an algorithm to automatically identify links between the SDG targets and recommendations from the UN Human Rights Council’s Universal Periodic Review (UPR). The tool aims to facilitate follow-up and review of the 2030 Agenda at the global, regional and national levels.

The UPR is a peer review mechanism under the HRC that aims to improve human rights in UN Member States by reviewing their human rights records and providing an opportunity for each State to describe actions they have taken to improve their human rights situations and obligations. According to DIHR’s ‘Human Rights Guide to the SDGs,’ over 92% of SDG targets are “linked to specific provisions of international human rights instruments,” underscoring the mutually reinforcing nature of human rights and the SDGs. DIHR argues that recommendations from human rights mechanisms like the UPR can help guide countries’ SDG implementation, identify vulnerable groups that may require special support, and develop actions to realize both human rights obligations and sustainable development commitments. DIHR further argues that such approaches will enhance accountability, coherence, efficacy, inclusion, participation and prioritization in SDG implementation.

Users of the UPR-SDG Data Explorer can explore links between the 169 SDG targets and UPR recommendations for specific regions, countries or groups. For example, under the ‘Groups’ tab, users can filter among children, human rights defenders, indigenous people, internally displaced persons, members of minorities, migrants, persons with disabilities, refugees and asylum seekers, and women and girls. Users can also select among the UPR’s three cycles that have been conducted so far, and for either “accepted” or “noted” human rights recommendations.

As an illustration, for SDG 1 (no poverty), the Explorer shows 47 recommendations. The recommendation for Burundi focuses on strengthening efforts to increase food security for the population, particularly those in extreme poverty in rural areas, and to increase its budget for social infrastructure and social services, including health, education and water and sanitation. The Explorer displays links between this recommendation and seven SDG targets: target 1.1 (on eradicating extreme poverty for all people everywhere); target 1.4 (on ensuring equal rights to economic resources, access to basic services, ownership and control over land and other forms of property, natural resources, technology and financial services); target 2.1 (on ending hunger and ensuring access by all people to safe, nutritious food); target 3.c (on increasing health financing and the health workforce); target 6.1 (achieving universal and equitable access to safe and affordable drinking water for all); target 6.2 (achieving access to adequate and equitable sanitation and hygiene for all and ending open defecation); and target 9.1 (on infrastructure to support economic and human well-being).

DIHR notes that the analysis underlying the SDG-UPR Data Explorer is based on the Universal Human Rights Index produced by the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

DIHR also published a report titled, ‘Human Rights and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: Lessons learned and next steps,’ which shares tools and lessons learned to inspire integrated approaches that can contribute to realizing human rights and sustainable development for all. The publication also reflects on ways that human rights mechanisms and institutions can contribute to global and regional platforms for follow-up and review, including the UN High-level Political Forum on Sustainable Development (HLPF) and Regional Forums for Sustainable Development (RFSDs).

Also on human rights and the 2030 Agenda, the HRC will organize two one-day intersessional meetings on human rights and the 2030 Agenda, in 2019 and 2020, which will align with the themes of the respective HLPF sessions. The meetings will provide an opportunity for UN Member States, UN agencies, funds and programmes and UN and regional human rights mechanisms and other stakeholders to share achievements, good practices, challenges and lessons learned on the promotion and protection of human rights and implementation of the 2030 Agenda. [UPR-SDG Data Explorer] [UPR Webpage] [The Human Rights Guide to the SDGs] [Human Rights and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: Lessons Learned and Next Steps] [HRC Resolution]

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