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Stakeholders and civil society groups have published numerous reports as inputs to the UN processes to define a post-2015 development agenda, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the outcome of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development (FfD3).

The reports offer proposals and recommendations on the financing, accountability, and implementation of the post-2015 agenda, and consider the ambition and course of the negotiations ahead.

May 2015: Stakeholders and civil society groups have published numerous reports as inputs to the UN processes to define a post-2015 development agenda, Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and the outcome of the Third International Conference on Financing for Development (FfD3). The reports offer proposals and recommendations on the financing, accountability and implementation of the post-2015 agenda, and consider the ambition and course of the negotiations ahead.

IDDRI has published an issue brief, titled ‘Three commitments governments should take to make Sustainable Development Goals the drivers of a major transformation.’ The brief recommends that countries establish a country-relevant dashboard of the SDGs to narrow their targets and associated indicators, and then engage in national strategic planning around that dashboard, while consolidating national investment plans and climate-proofing and scaling up development finance.

The Global Health Technologies Coalition (GHTC) published a report, titled ‘Seven takeaways from the post-2015 negotiations,’ which attempts to explain the on-going negotiations as they relate to the context of health. The report notes that, inter alia: many parts of the agenda are still undetermined or final; it is unclear how exactly the agenda will be financed; and innovation in health will be critical to achieving all of the SDGs.

In an article for Devex, titled ‘Post-2015 negotiations: Are governments passing the buck to businesses?’ author Paul Quitos writes that there is an “emerging consensus” that private sector finance will provide needed funds for development. Quitos warns that such an approach could lead to greater commercialization or privatization of public services, as well as resources being directed towards profitable sectors rather than marginalized groups.

The Center for Global Development has published a blog by Lant Pritchett, titled ‘Labor Mobility and Migration: The Missing Heart of the Sustainable Development Goals,’ which examines inequalities based on the country location of a person’s birth. Pritchett states that SDG target 10.7 on migration, as currently formulated, does not rise to the ambition of the post-2015 agenda and allows for discrimination based on national origin.

Shanti Krishnan has published a blog for Dalberg, titled ‘Blended Finance: Catalyzing Private Capital for Development Impact.’ The article considers the US$4 trillion in needed annual investments to achieve the SDGs, compared to the $1.4 trillion in current annual investments, and argues that private investment in emerging and frontier markets can be a force for global development if directed properly.

CAFOD and Beyond 2015 have released a discussion paper, titled ‘What If? Mapping scenarios to the end of 2015.’ The paper imagines four scenarios for the conclusion of the negotiations on the post-2015 development agenda, within the context of on-going negotiations on the FfD3 outcome and a climate change agreement. Naming these four scenarios the “train wreck,” “paper agreement,” “business as usual,” and “a transformative agenda,” the paper considers the likelihood of each alongside the current state of play in the negotiations.

Beyond 2015 published the group’s recommendations on means of implementation for the post-2015 development agenda and FfD3, which urge governments to raise the level of ambition for both agreements. The paper emphasizes giving attention to structural and systemic issues, and offers recommendations on: domestic and international public and private finance, public private partnerships, trade, debt sustainability, climate finance, reform of global financial institutions, participation, technology and innovation, capacity building, data monitoring and accountability, and implementation at the national and local levels.

Development Initiatives has released a new ‘Development Data Hub’ on its website. The Hub visualizes financial resource flow data, alongside poverty and development indicators. Data can be compared at multiple levels, through maps, charts and other graphics in order to better understand complex data.

Regions Refocus has launched a “virtual teach-in” video, featuring Peruvian economist Oscar Ugarteche, which explores the influence of international corporations on global goveranance. The organization has also released a ‘Language Map and Civil Society Policy Recommendations,’ a tool to inform regional advocacy which details African Government Positions alongside regional civil society proposals.

The Transparency, Accountability, and Participation (TAP) Network has released a position paper on accountability for the post-2015 development agenda, which it declares is an “indispensable prerequisite.” The paper calls for responsibility, answerability and enforceability to underpin various levels of accountability, and recommends that the post-2015 follow-up and review mechanisms be regular and well-defined, with a dedicated secretariat.

The Millennium Institute and the Biovision Foundation have released a reaction to the revised FfD3 draft outcome document, from the point of view of food security, nutrition, and sustainable agriculture. The paper reaffirms the inclusive role of the Committee on World Food Security (CFS), the need for country-ownership in the design of national plans, and the inclusion of country-initiated, inclusive, and evidence-based assessments.

The Finnish NGO Task Force has released a position paper on the post-2015 agenda, which stresses that universality, sustainability and planetary boundaries, and human rights be integrated in all parts of the framework. The report shows how these principles can be integrated across each of the 17 SDGs, as well as the agenda’s targets and indicators. [IDDRI Issue Brief] [GHTC Article] [Devex Article] [Center for Global Development Blog] [Dalberg Blog] [CAFOD and Beyond 2015 Discussion Paper] [Beyond 2015 Recommendations] [Development Initiatives Data Hub] [Regions Refocus Virtual Teach-In] [Regions Refocus Language Map and Civil Society Policy Recommendations] [Finnish NGO Task Force Position Paper] [Biovision-Millennium Institute Reaction]

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