Second Committee Discusses MICs, Globalization, Interdependence
Photo by IISD/ENB | Kiara Worth
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The Second Committee discussed a number of issues relevant for middle income countries (MICs) during a meeting on globalization and interdependence.

El Salvador, for the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), supported by Botswana, Costa Rica, Cuba, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Maldives and others, called for classification and graduation criteria for MICs that go beyond per capita income.

13 October 2017: Governments discussed challenges faced by middle-income countries (MICs) during a meeting of the UN General Assembly’s (UNGA) Second Committee (Economic and Financial). Speakers noted that MICs countries suffer from labor market shifts, rapid technological advances and climate change.

The Second Committee meeting on globalization and interdependence took place on 13 October 2017 at the UN Headquarters in New York, US.

Four reports were presented during the meeting. Liu Zhenmin, Under-Secretary-General for Economic and Social Affairs, presented the Secretary-General’s report on fulfilling the promise of globalization: advancing sustainable development in an interconnected world (document A/72/301). Shamika Sirimanne, the UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD), presented the report on science, technology and innovation (STI) for development (document A/72/257). Dawn Holland, the Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), presented the report on development cooperation with MICs (document A/72/329). Marie Paule Roudil, the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), introduced the report of the UNESCO Director-General on culture and sustainable development (document A/72/336).

During the discussion, Nigeria asked if mechanisms are in place to ensure that globalization benefits are more evenly distributed. Ecuador, for the Group of the 77 and China (G-77/ China), supported by South Africa, called for technology transfer and diffusion on concessional and preferential terms from developed countries to developing countries.

Singapore, for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), supported by India, expressed concern that “isolationist and protectionist voices are gaining force,” while noting that complex global challenges, such as terrorism, cybersecurity, pandemics and climate change require global solutions.

Bangladesh, for the Least Developed Countries (LDCs), supported by Nepal, called on Member States to contribute to the Technology Bank for the LDCs and for greater public‑private partnerships.

El Salvador, for the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), expressed concern on the graduation criteria for the list of countries eligible to receive official development assistance (ODA) and trade benefits applied by various international organizations. Supported by Botswana, Costa Rica, Cuba, Chile, Guatemala, Honduras, Maldives and others, he called for classification and graduation criteria that go beyond per capita income.

Armenia, for the Like-minded Group of Supporters of MICs, said the Group adopted a ministerial declaration on the unique challenges faced by MICs, which calls for redefining the classification of developing countries.

Armenia, for the Like-minded Group of Supporters of MICs, said the Group adopted a ministerial declaration on the unique challenges faced by MICs, asking for the classification of developing countries to be redefined and to advance criteria that move beyond per capita income. He called for the UN to elaborate a comprehensive strategy aimed at facilitating sustainable development with MICs and for “graduation” policies that are sequenced, phased, gradual and result in tailored solutions.

Belarus said work on addressing MICs’ needs lacks a unified approach. Botswana called for strengthening the UN development cooperation with MICs. [UN Press Release][Second Committee Website][Second Committee Calendar of Meetings]

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