Researchers Propose 100 Questions for Post-2015 Development
story highlights

The Sheffield Institute for International Development (SIID) and the UN Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) have published the results of a priority-setting exercise on international development research, proposing 100 research questions that relate to implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development.

The exercise sought to identify funding and cooperation priorities for international development actors.

United Nations Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD)March 2015: The Sheffield Institute for International Development (SIID) and the UN Research Institute for Social Development (UNRISD) have published the results of a priority-setting exercise on international development research, proposing 100 research questions that relate to implementation of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. The exercise sought to identify funding and cooperation priorities for international development actors.

The SIID Project, “ID 100: The Hundred Most Important Questions in International Development,” invited questions from academics, think tanks, NGOs and multilateral organizations during a four-month consultation process. The approach was based on a “knowledge co-production” methodology that has previously been applied in the area of natural sciences. More than 700 people from 34 countries took part in the consultation, many from the UK (49.4%) and the rest of Europe (15.9%). Others were from the US, Latin America, Africa and Australasia. SIID is a part of the University of Sheffield, UK.

An expert group shortlisted the questions, and the selection was further refined through a workshop and voting process. The authors of the report, titled ‘A Hundred Key Questions for the Post-2015 Development Agenda,’ observe that the final 100 questions reflect long-standing concerns in international development, as well as questions about the role of actors that have recently entered the development sphere, including the private sector, emerging economic powers and middle-income countries (MICs). They highlight the need for “deeper collective reflection” on the role and relationships of different actors in international development, noting that many of the questions relate to broad issues in development politics, practices and institutions. [Publication: Working Paper: A Hundred Key Questions for the Post-2015 Development Agenda] [Project Video and Infographics]

related posts