OECD Report Presents New Approach to Monitoring Fragility for Post-2015 Agenda
story highlights

Addressing fragility in the post-2015 development agenda is critical to eradicate poverty, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development's (OECD) 2015 report on fragility.

‘State of Fragility 2015: Meeting Post-2015 Ambitions' analyzes countries' development risks and resilience in the context of the proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and discusses the implications of a universal approach to monitoring fragility.

OECD26 March 2015: Addressing fragility in the post-2015 development agenda is critical to eradicate poverty, according to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development’s (OECD) 2015 report on fragility. ‘States of Fragility 2015: Meeting Post-2015 Ambitions’ analyzes countries’ development risks and resilience in the context of the proposed Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), and discusses the implications of a universal approach to monitoring fragility.

In contrast to previous reports in the series, the 2015 edition assesses fragility as an issue that can affect all countries, rather than only those traditionally considered conflict-affected or fragile. It analyzes country fragility using three aspects of SDG 16 on promoting peaceful and inclusive societies and two on the wider SDG framework: violence; access to justice; accountable and inclusive institutions; economic inclusion and stability; and capacities to prevent and adapt to social, economic and environmental shocks and disasters. The countries identified as most vulnerable on these five dimensions are ones typically included on lists of fragile states and economies.

The results also identify 12 countries that have never been on a fragile list, as vulnerable on economic inclusion and stability dimensions. On institutions, for instance, Algeria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Cuba, Swaziland and Viet Nam are identified as vulnerable. On justice, China, India, Mozambique, Panama, Tanzania and Zambia are identified as vulnerable. The report highlights several lower-middle-income countries with poor access to justice, sub-national conflict and high levels of crime, particularly those in Latin America and the Caribbean.

On official development assistance (ODA), the report cites “huge imbalances” in aid distribution, notes that ODA is not sufficiently aligned with national priorities, particularly those on peacebuilding and statebuilding, and says ODA to least developed countries (LDCs) vulnerable to shocks and exposure “is not commensurate with their greater exposure.” It recommends: scaling up ODA to the poorest and most fragile countries; and agreeing on norms and targets for monitoring spending on global peace, security and conflict resolution.

The report also highlights that fragile states and economies have lagged behind other developing countries in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It estimates that poverty is “likely to be even more concentrated in fragile countries” by 2030.

A new portfolio of interventions and tools, such as demand-driven aid modalities and new debt instruments and equity investments to mobilize private finance, will be necessary to make progress on fragility, according to the report. Its conclusion addresses the role of the international community in ensuring it is “fit for purpose” to address fragility in the post-2015 development agenda.

OECD has published the Fragile States report since 2005, to provide evidence to inform international debate on fragile and conflict-affected countries. [Publication: States of Fragility 2015: Meeting Post-2015 Ambitions] [OECD Publication Website]

related posts