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The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has published a report titled 'Overview of INDCs Submitted by 31 August 2015,' which summarizes the key information communicated in countries' intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs) submitted under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

The report examines the mitigation components of INDCs that have been submitted by 31 August 2015, analyzing their clarity and transparency, and likely aggregate impact on greenhouse (GHG) emissions.

oecd.ieaSeptember 2015: The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) and International Energy Agency (IEA) have published a report, titled ‘Overview of INDCs Submitted by 31 August 2015,’ which summarizes the key information communicated in countries’ intended nationally determined contributions (INDCs) submitted under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The report examines the mitigation components of INDCs that had been submitted by 31 August 2015, analyzing their clarity and transparency as well as the likely aggregate impact on greenhouse (GHG) emissions.

The report was authored by Christina Hood (IEA), Liwayway Adkins (IEA)and Ellina Levina (IEA). On the transparency and clarity of the INDCs, the report assesses the nature of the goals, whether absolute emission reduction targets or relative to a baseline; and whether economy-wide or sectoral. It also looks at the conditions attached to some of the INDCs, particularly relating to the availability of international support.

The report also analyzes the mitigation ambition of the INDCs, using four studies that have undertaken assessments of the INDCs.

By 31 August, 29 INDCs had been submitted, and the report indicates that “just over half of the INDCs (15 of 29 INDCs) put forward absolute greenhouse gas emission goals.” In addition, most Parties had “included a narrative in their INDC explaining why they consider it to be fair and ambitious, and how it contributes to the objective of the Convention.” The report also indicates that “Several developing countries have been able to provide specific estimates of finance needs for their INDC, including indicating what can be provided domestically and what international support is needed.”

The report concludes that these studies show that although collectively the INDCs will have an impact on emissions, they are still not ambitious enough to limit global temperature increase to 2°C above pre-industrial levels. [Publication: Overview of INDCs Submitted by 31 August 2015]

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