Mitigation Update: BP Reports Decline in Global Coal Consumption, IEA Reviews Hungary’s Energy Policy
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According to the ‘BP Statistical Review of World Energy: June 2017,’ an annual report issued by BP every June, in 2016, global coal consumption faced its second successive annual decline of 1.7%, while renewable power (excluding hydro) grew by 14.1%.

The International Energy Agency (IEA) issued its ‘Hungary 2017 Review,’ analyzing the country’s efforts in ensuring a sustainable and secure energy sector.

15 June 2017: Two recent reports have provided evidence of the ongoing transition to a clean energy future. The ‘BP Statistical Review of World Energy: June 2017’ indicates a low growth in global primary energy consumption in 2016 and a shift in the fuel mix away from coal towards lower carbon fuels. The International Energy Agency (IEA) issued its ‘Hungary 2017 Review,’ welcoming the country’s efforts to reduce its emissions.

According to BP’s an annual report, global coal consumption faced its second successive annual decline of 53 million tonnes of oil equivalent (mtoe), or 1.7%. The report also finds that renewables, led by wind and solar, accounted for almost a third of the increase in primary energy in 2016, despite their relatively small share within total energy of around 4%.

The BP report indicates that renewable power (excluding hydro) grew by 14.1% in 2016, the largest increment on record.

According to BP, countries that saw the largest declines in coal consumption in 2016 include the US and China, with decreases of 8.8% and 1.6% respectively. Coal consumption in the UK reached its lowest level on record, with a 52.5% fall. Coal’s share of global primary energy consumption fell to its lowest share since 2004, reaching 28.1%. Global coal production, too, underwent the largest decline on record, falling by 6.2%. China’s production fell by 7.9%, and US production fell by 19%.

The report also indicates that renewable power (excluding hydro) grew by 14.1% in 2016, the largest increment on record. Asia Pacific was the largest producing region of renewable power. China overtook the US to be the largest single renewables producer.

At the same time, the BP report finds, carbon emissions from energy consumption in 2016 increased by 0.1%. [BP Statistical Review of World Energy: June 2017] [Bloomberg Markets Press Release]

In other renewable energy-related news, the IEA issued its ‘Hungary 2017 Review,’ analyzing the country’s efforts in ensuring a sustainable and secure energy sector. The report notes that Hungary’s greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions have declined and that the second National Climate Change Strategy, which will be submitted to the national parliament in 2017, includes a series of measures and actions required in order to implement the Paris Agreement. However, the report recommends more ambitious targets for emission reductions. In particular, it calls for implementing further measures aimed at reducing emissions and improving energy efficiency in road transportation. [Hungary 2017 Review] [Publication Landing Page] [IEA Press Release]

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