Japan’s Long-term Strategy Pledges Emission Reductions Through “Virtuous Cycle of Environment and Growth”
Yokohama, Japan / Viviane Okubo on Unsplash
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Japan’s Low Emission Development Strategy highlights the country’s intent to reduce emissions by 80% by 2050.

The Strategy describes the country’s long-term vision for the energy, industry and transport sectors, as well as for community and living, and the direction of related policies and measures.

Japan will support decarbonization at the global level, including by helping partner countries formulate their NDCs.

26 June 2019: The Government of Japan has become the 12th country to submit its long-term strategy (LTS) for low-emission development to the UNFCCC Secretariat, which covers the period 2018-2050. Japan’s Low Emission Development Strategy (LEDS) highlights the country’s intent to reduce emissions by 80% by 2050, while realizing “a virtuous cycle of environment and growth” with business-led disruptive innovation, rapid implementation of actions, and efforts from other countries.

The LTS describes the country’s long-term vision for the energy, industry and transport sectors, as well as for community and living, and the direction of related policies and measures.

On energy, the LTS mentions options related to energy efficiency, renewable energy, storage batteries, hydrogen, nuclear energy, and carbon capture and storage (CCS) and carbon capture and utilization (CCU).

On industry, the Strategy describes Japan’s intent to establish new production processes to achieve decarbonized manufacturing with disruptive innovation through the use of carbon dioxide (CO2)-free hydrogen, feedstock change, and improved energy efficiency, development and introduction of low-global warming potential (GWP) and non-fluorocarbon refrigerant technologies.

Japan’s LTS describes efforts to achieve the world’s highest level of environmental performance of Japanese cars for worldwide consumption by 2050.

Regarding transport, the LTS describes efforts to achieve the “world’s highest level of environmental performance” of Japanese cars for worldwide consumption by 2050 through enhanced international policy coordination on electric vehicles. It also describes, inter alia, local decarbonization, achieving the SDGs and carbon-neutral living by 2050.

The LTS discusses the promotion of innovation for practical application and use of cross-sectoral decarbonizing technologies. It details a Progressive Environment Innovation Strategy, which includes technical assessment based on cost required by users and emission reductions, and accelerating public research and development. The LTS also addresses cross-sectoral policy measures, including: human resources development; enhancement of an integrated approach in building a resilient society; a just transition; government efforts to decarbonize; and carbon pricing.

Japan will aim for stronger business initiatives, as well as target setting and visualizing issues for commercialization in the fields of energy efficiency and transformation, CCUS, hydrogen, renewable energy and nuclear. The LTS also highlights promotion of green finance and initiatives to expand environmental, social and governance (ESG) finance.

Japan will also support decarbonization at the global level, including by helping partner countries formulate their Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs).

The policy measures detailed in the strategy will be reviewed approximately every six years, and implementation will consider input of all stakeholders, including younger generations.

The LEDS was developed under the guidance of the Ministry of Economy, with support from the Global Green Growth Institute (GGGI). Japan joins Benin, Canada, the Czech Republic, Fiji, France, Germany, the Marshall Islands, Mexico, the US, the UK and Ukraine who have already submitted their LTSs. [Japan’s LEDS] [UNFCCC LEDS Website]

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