IOM Identifies Migration as Positive Adaptation Strategy, Important Component of SDGs
Photo by IISD | Lynn Wagner
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The IOM published a report titled, ‘Migration as Adaptation to Environmental and Climate Change: The Case of Kenya,’ showing that migration can be a positive adaptation strategy to environmental and climate change.

An IOM infosheet explores the linkages between extreme heat and migration.

An IOM publication titled, ‘Migration in the 2030 Agenda,’ illustrates how different areas of migration are addressed in the SDGs.

August 2017: According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), while climate change is threatening to displace more and more people in the absence of mitigation actions, enacting policies and strategies that help manage potential increased migration flows more effectively is essential. The IOM views migration as an adaptation strategy, and suggests that implementation of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) can help manage crises stemming from increased migration due to climate change and extreme heat. Three recent IOM publications discuss such challenges and opportunities, exploring migration as it relates to environmental and climate change, extreme heat, and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and the SDGs.

A publication titled, ‘Migration as Adaptation to Environmental and Climate Change: The Case of Kenya,’ finds that migration can be a positive adaptation strategy to environmental and climate change in Kenya, particularly when it helps migrants acquire skills and knowledge. However, the results also show that access to services, including water, education and health, is inadequate among migrant households, and that migrants face challenges when integrating into receiving communities. The report recommends: reviewing environmental and migration policies to ensure prioritization of the migration and environment nexus; developing plans and strategies to increase the resilience of communities affected by climate change; enhancing policy and guidelines on early warning systems; reviewing inclusivity of social protection plans; and involving community members in developing adaptation and integration strategies.

Kenya is one of the six countries in the Migration, Environment and Climate Change: Evidence for Policy (MECLEP) project. The EU-funded project is being implemented by the IOM. It aims to enhance knowledge on the relationship between migration and environmental change, and develop policy options on how migration can benefit adaptation strategies. The other project countries are the Dominican Republic, Haiti, Mauritius, Papua New Guinea and Viet Nam. [Migration as Adaptation to Environmental and Climate Change: The Case of Kenya] [Publication Landing Page]

An infosheet titled, ‘Extreme Heat and Migration,’ explores the linkages between extreme heat and migration, and provides an overview of associated challenges and ways to overcome them. It shows that, with a global temperature increase of 1.5°C by the end of the century, 30 to 60 million people will likely live in areas where the average heat in the hottest month will be too high for the body to function well. With a 2°C rise, the number will increase to more than 100 million. Without any mitigation action, more than one billion people are projected to live in these “super hot” areas by the end of the century. The report finds that migration management strategies are critical in anticipation of increased migration flows due to, inter alia, more disruptive events caused by climate change-related heat, such as frequent droughts, wildfires and heat waves. [Extreme Heat and Migration Infosheet] [Publication Landing Page]

The ‘Migration in the 2030 Agenda’ report helps advance implementation of SDG target 10.7 (orderly, safe and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies), 8.7 (eradication of forced labor, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labor), 8.8 (protection of safe and secure environments for all workers) and 10.C (reduction of transaction costs for migrant remittances), among others.

A publication titled, ‘Migration in the 2030 Agenda,’ illustrates how different migration-related issues are addressed in the SDGs, and elaborates on challenges and opportunities relevant to migration-related targets. The report discusses, inter alia: diaspora engagement; implementation of migration, environment and climate change-related commitments of the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development; migration and health; gender equality through migration governance; a case study from Armenia on labor mobility; migrants and cities; migration and environmental change; prevention and resolution of displacement; and children and migration. The report helps advance implementation of a number of SDG targets, including 10.7 (orderly, safe and responsible migration and mobility of people, including through implementation of planned and well-managed migration policies), 8.7 (eradication of forced labor, modern slavery, human trafficking and child labor), 8.8 (protection of safe and secure environments for all workers) and 10.C (reduction of transaction costs for migrant remittances), among others. [Migration in the 2030 Agenda] [Publication Landing Page]

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