INECC Event Reviews CDM Projects in India
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In most cases, the stated sustainable development benefits of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects in India have not been realized, with insignificant impact on indicators such as poverty and employment, according to a side event organized by the Indian Network on Ethics and Climate Change (INECC) at the Lima Climate Change Conference.

'CDM and Sustainable Development: Insights From India' reviewed the key findings of a study of CDM projects in India.

limacop202 December 2014: In most cases, the stated sustainable development benefits of Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) projects in India have not been realized, with insignificant impact on indicators such as poverty and employment, according to a side event organized by the Indian Network on Ethics and Climate Change (INECC) at the Lima Climate Change Conference. ‘CDM and Sustainable Development: Insights From India’ reviewed the key findings of a study of CDM projects in India.

Raman Mehta, Vasudha Foundation, presented the study, noting India has been the second largest beneficiary of CDM projects after China, with a total of 2,857 approved projects by the National CDM Authority by mid-2012.

Ajita Tiwari, INECC, highlighted grassroots perspectives on linking community concerns with national policy advocacy. She noted that making a meaningful transition to sustainability in the current CDM environment requires plugging existing domestic policy gaps, notably the exemption of large renewable energy projects from environmental impact assessment requirements and ensuring effective, efficient and equitable use of energy subsidies. She called for a focus on off-grid solutions and strengthening local research and capacity development.

Eva Filzmoser, Director, Carbon Market Watch, said that, while the CDM benefit tracker is designed to ensure greater sustainable development impacts from projects, it is undermined by its focus on voluntary reporting with no provisions for stakeholder engagement, monitoring or third-party verification. She called for the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the UNFCCC to approve a coherent framework for promoting public participation by enforcing existing “good rules” in addition to creating new ones.

Siddharth D’Souza, Laya Resource Center, discussed a Verified Emission Reduction (VER) carbon project in a remote region of Andhra Pradesh that is experimenting with market approaches to replace inefficient woodstoves among 4,000 poor households. He noted it is the first such project to be registered internationally. He highlighted lessons learned, including the need to: incentivize carbon projects for the poor by facilitating the use of efficient, environmentally friendly technologies for their direct use; simplify and reduce the costs of registration and validation of projects; and ensure profit sharing with the community.

During the discussion, participants highlighted the need to address corporate sector accountability to local communities and to create alternative frameworks for small-scale CDM projects.

INECC is a national network of organizations and individuals working on climate change, especially as it pertains to marginalized communities. [IISD RS ENBOTS Coverage] [IISD RS Coverage of Lima Climate Change Conference] [INECC Website]


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