High-level Event Discusses Women, Peace and Security in 2030 Agenda
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High-level representatives of governments and the UN system discussed the role of women in fostering peace and security in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, during a high-level ministerial event celebrating the 15th anniversary of the adoption of UN Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security (WPS).

It was co-organized by the Permanent Missions of Italy, Kenya, Namibia, Spain, Thailand and the United Arab Emirates.

UNGA LOGO30 September 2015: High-level representatives of governments and the UN system discussed the role of women in fostering peace and security in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, during a high-level ministerial event celebrating the 15th anniversary of the adoption of UN Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on Women, Peace and Security (WPS). It was co-organized by the Permanent Missions of Italy, Kenya, Namibia, Spain, Thailand and the United Arab Emirates.

The event, titled ‘Women, Peace and Security in the Post-2015 Development Agenda,’ took place on 30 September 2015 in New York, US.

Sarah Sewall, US Under-Secretary of State for Civilian Security, Democracy, and Human Rights, said Resolution 1325 made it clear that the international community cannot achieve lasting international peace and security without the full participation of women, who are not just victims in conflict, but “essential leaders in its prevention and resolution.” She recalled that the Resolution called on the UN and its Member States to: involve more women as participants in decision-making about peace and security; take special measures to protect women and girls from gender-based violence; empower women in conflict prevention and resolution efforts; and ensure that women share in relief and recovery efforts following international crises. Sewall noted that, as the world rallies behind a more preventive, “whole-of-society” effort to reverse the growth of violent extremist groups, women should play a leading role. If included in the groups that negotiate peace agreements, she explained that women can enlarge the scope of peace negotiations to address other social needs that may have otherwise been neglected, and can broaden how peace negotiations define security – from an end to fighting to living without fear of violence or sexual assault – which, she underlined, might lead to more widely accepted and durable peace agreements.

Paolo Gentiloni, Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Cooperation, Italy, stressed that women “are the answer across the board” in ensuring that a peaceful, prosperous and just world is effectively achieved. He explained how women and girls play a crucial role in reconstruction, as they reinvest up to 90% of their income on family’s needs – compared to men who reinvest only 30-40%. “The key word here is empowerment” he said, stressing that economically empowered women can contribute much more effectively to sustainable development and to sustainable peace and security, and therefore their education and their economic empowerment are both a tool and a goal. [Concept Note] [Paolo Gentiloni Remarks] [Sarah Sewall Remarks]

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