18 Foundations Call for Increasing Investments in Forests and Land to Fight Climate Change
Photo by Nikita Birkbeck
story highlights

Eighteen philanthropic organizations released a joint statement at the Global Climate Action Summit, expressing support for land use policies and finance that help achieve ambitious climate targets and contribute to sustainable development, and for indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ land rights and management of forests.

The organizations call for increasing investments in forests and lands to tackle climate change.

11 September 2018: At the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS), a group of 18 philanthropic organizations signed a joint statement that calls for urgently increasing investments in conserving forests and lands to support their role in the fight against climate change. The organizations underscore the importance of conserving the world’s forests and lands for the benefit of people and the planet.

In the statement, the organizations note that forests and lands remove 30 percent of the carbon emissions that are added to the atmosphere each year, and could provide “an additional 30 percent of the mitigation needed by 2030 to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees.” Despite this contribution, the organizations observe, forests and lands receive only three percent of funding for climate action.

The organizations express their support for: land use policies and finance that help achieve ambitious climate targets and contribute to sustainable development; policies that protect and recognize the role of forests and sustainable land use in alleviating poverty and supporting rural livelihoods; and agricultural production and investments that do not cause deforestation or rural violence, preserve biodiversity, improve soil health, and support a transition to sustainable food systems. The signatories further express support for expanding, protecting and restoring national parks, conservation areas and forests that respect the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP) and their right to free, prior and informed consent (FPIC), and for indigenous peoples’ and local communities’ land rights and management of forests and an end to violence against and criminalization of environmental defenders.

Forests and lands remove 30 percent of the carbon emissions added to the atmosphere each year but receive only three percent of funding for climate action.

Through their funding commitment to these priorities, the foundations express their hope to inspire new and deeper investments from other foundations, governments and businesses to shift towards sustainable and rights-based land use and forest management. They conclude by emphasizing the benefits of healthy forests, including to make the world more resilient to climate change and secure a more stable, livable climate for all.

The following foundations signed the declaration: American Jewish World Service; Arapyau Foundation; Christensen Fund; ClimateWorks Foundation; David and Lucile Packard Foundation; Doris Duke Charitable Foundation; Ford Foundation; Good Energies Foundation; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; Leonardo DiCaprio Foundation; Mulago Foundation; The Rockefeller Foundation; Swift Foundation; Tamalpais Trust; Tata Trusts; Thousand Currents; and UN Foundation.

The GCAS convened in San Francisco, US, from 12-14 September. [Climate and Land Use Alliance Statement]


related events


related posts